Category Archives: Available studentships

Studentships available with closing dates are listed on this page

Available studentships

 

The CDP institutions and their partner Higher Education institutions usually announce available studentships in the first quarter of each year, though some may be announced later.

The advertised studentships are listed below.

 

Anglo-Saxon England and the Continent: the manuscript evidence

The British Library and the University of Leicester are pleased to invite applications for a three-year AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Partnership PhD Studentship, available from 1 October 2015.

Applications are invited for a doctoral studentship tenable at the University of Leicester in close collaboration with The British Library. This doctoral award is funded through the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) under its Collaborative Doctoral Programme. The project will be supervised by Professor Joanna Story at Leicester and by Dr Claire Breay, Lead Curator of Medieval and Earlier Manuscripts, at the British Library.

The successful candidate will undertake a thesis on Anglo-Saxon England and the Continent centred on the rich manuscript resources at the British Library. The culture of Anglo-Saxon England before the Norman conquest is highly distinctive, not least through the use of the Old English vernacular as a language of written record; but Anglo-Saxon political, religious, economic, linguistic, literary and artistic history cannot be properly understood without reference to contemporary connections with Europe. These cross-Channel connections were always significant, and are manifest in many different ways through manuscripts preserved at the British Library.

This studentship coincides with the three-year period of research and preparation for a major British Library exhibition on the Anglo-Saxons that opens in October 2018, and which explores the history, art, and culture of this period through the medium of extant manuscripts. This offers the student an exceptional opportunity to participate in the development of an international exhibition and the Library expects the student to contribute to related publications (in print and online), public events, and academic conferences.

Closing date: Friday 10 April 2015

For further information please follow the link:  http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/history/postgraduate/AngloSaxonEnglandFurtherParticulars.docx

The Changing Cultures of Government Science since 1979: Exploring Privatisation and Commercialisation through Life Histories

 

The British Library and the University of Leicester are pleased to invite applications for a   three-year AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Partnership PhD Studentship, available from 1 October 2015.
Applications are invited for a doctoral studentship tenable at the University of Leicester in close collaboration with The British Library. This doctoral award is funded through the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) under its Collaborative Doctoral Programme. The project will be supervised by Dr Sally Horrocks and Professor Stuart Ball, at Leicester, and Dr Rob Perks, Curator of Oral History and Director of National Life Stories at the British Library.

The successful candidate will undertake a project based on oral history fieldwork that will explore how the commercialisation and privatisation of government research laboratories affected the workplace cultures, working lives and careers of the scientists who were employed in them.  This will build on the life story interviews with government scientists already collected by the Oral History of British Science (OHBS) project and the award holder will become an integral member of the OHBS team.  Full training in oral history fieldwork techniques and archiving procedures will be provided, and all the interviews this project generates will be archived in the British Library as part of the OHBS collection.  This will ensure that it will create a lasting contribution to the national collection of oral history material as well as generating an outstanding PhD thesis.  The award holder will also be fully involved in the life of the British Library and National Life Stories, including contributing to the project website, Voices of Science (http://www.bl.uk/voices-of-science) and taking part in other forms of public engagement.

Closing date: Friday 10 April 2015

Please follow the link for further information:

http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/history/postgraduate/TheChangingCulturesFurtherParticulars.docx

 

 

 

John Forster (1812-76) and the Making of Victorian Literature

The University of York and the Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A) in London are seeking applications for one fully funded PhD studentship. Funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council, this three-year PhD research programme will offer the award-holder a unique opportunity to undertake original research leading to a PhD while gaining exposure to both one of the UK’s leading universities and one of the world’s great museums. The studentship will begin in October 2015, and be jointly supervised by Professor John Bowen (Department of English & Related Literature, University of York) and Professor Bill Sherman (Head of Research at the V&A).

The student will explore the role of John Forster, a major figure in nineteenth-century literary culture whose writing, criticism and entrepreneurship placed him at the heart of the changes that took place in the Victorian literary marketplace. Through his networks of friendship and advice with major authors such as Dickens and Browning; as editor of The Examiner, the most influential radical periodical of the period; as author of literary biographies and contributor to many important journals; and as literary adviser to the publishers Chapman and Hall, Forster played a leading role in the creation and reception of nineteenth-century fiction, drama and poetry, and changed decisively the possibilities and ethos of the modern literary profession. This project seeks both to understand Forster’s complex, shaping role in the dynamic and often conflicted world of Victorian literary culture and to bring that understanding to new publics.

Closing Date: Thursday 30 April 2015 (interviews will be held on Monday 18 May)

For further information please follow the link:

http://www.york.ac.uk/english/news-events/news/phd-v&a/

 

Object Journeys: Community co-production of collections knowledge and displays at a national museum

Applications are invited for a fully funded three-year AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Award between the Centre for Critical Studies in Museums, Galleries and Heritage, University of Leeds and the British Museum.

The lead supervisors for the project are Dr. Helen Graham (Leeds), Stuart Frost (British Museum) and Dr. William Rea (Leeds) with additional support from Sian Hunter Dodsworth (Head of Community Partnerships, British Museum).

This project will examine how national museums might best develop object interpretation and displays in collaboration with local and diverse communities. Object Journeys is a Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF)-funded programme run by the Community Partnerships Team at the British Museum exploring various forms of community collaboration.

The closing date is 12.00 on Friday 17th April 2015; interviews will be held during May in Leeds.

For further information please follow the link:

http://www.ccsmgh.leeds.ac.uk/news/object-journeys-community-co-production-of-collections-knowledge-and-displays-at-a-national-museum/

 

Domesticating the Sumerians in Mandate Iraq: contextualising Woolley’s excavations at Ur (1922-1934)

Applications are invited for a doctoral studentship tenable at University College London (UCL) History Department, in collaboration with the British Museum (BM). This doctoral award is funded though the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) under its Collaborative Doctoral Partnerships scheme. The project will be co-supervised by Professor Eleanor Robson at UCL, and Dr Jonathan Taylor at the BM.

UCL Department / Division: History
Duration of Studentship: Three Years (to start 01 October 2015)
Stipend: £16,413 per annum (rate as at 2014/15 session)

Studentship Description
The successful candidate will explore the motivations and methods in Middle Eastern archaeology at the nexus of the infancy of modern, scientific archaeology and the birth of the modern nation state of Iraq, and the lasting impact of these excavations on public understanding of the past. The project will take as primary case study Leonard Woolley’s important archaeological expedition to the ancient city of Ur in southern Iraq (1922–34). It will benefit from the Ur of the Chaldees project, currently underway at the British Museum and Penn Museum, which is providing integrated digital access to the complete finds and records of Woolley’s excavations.

Person Specification
We are looking for a highly motivated student with a strong academic record at undergraduate and MA level who will relish the opportunity of combining academic research on this topic with involvement with a national museum. We welcome applications from students with training in the history of science, broadly construed, or the modern history of British and/or US relations with the Middle East, particularly those who have an interest in embedding the study of objects and material culture in their study of the past. The appointee will be expected to attend relevant training courses arranged by a consortium of London-based Collaborative Doctoral Partnership institutions, as well as courses run for doctoral students within UCL.

Closing date: 31 March 2015

For further information please follow the link: http://ow.ly/KcOGL

 

The Embroidery Trade in 18th-century France

The University of Warwick and the Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A) in London invite applications for one fully funded PhD studentship. Funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council, this three year PhD research programme will be supervised jointly by Professor Giorgio Riello (Department of History, University of Warwick) and Professor Lesley Miller (Senior Curator of Textiles and Fashion at the V&A). The successful studentship will commence in autumn 2015.

The selected student will investigate the products, skills and networks of the embroiderers of 18th-century France. Embroidery was not only a polite accomplishment but also a well-established trade by the 18th-century, subject to the fluctuations of fashions in secular and ecclesiastical clothing and furnishings. Embroidery also provides a useful case study of a sector that did not require sophisticated machinery or large capital investment, and was not involved in major technological change during the century. This PhD will make a significant contribution to the history of fashion, as well as to other disciplines such as art, design and textile history, social and economic history, urban and gender history.

Closing Date: Tuesday 14 April 2015 (interviews will be held on Wednesday 13 May 2015 from 2pm)

For further information please follow the link:

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/history/news/?newsItem=094d43454bfe3d3b014c131dd98e26fc

 

A review of the worldwide effects and impact of Spanish Influenza

 

 

Applications are invited for an AHRC-funded PhD at Queen Mary, University of London: ‘A review of the worldwide effects and impact of Spanish Influenza, 1918-1919 based on IWM’s
medical collections’.

This is offered under the AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Partnership programme. The
partner institutions are Queen Mary, University of London and IWM. The studentship will be
supervised by Dr Rhodri Hayward and Dr Mark Honigsbaum, Queen Mary, University of London,
and Dr Simon Robbins of the IWM. This full-time studentship, which is funded for three years at standard AHRC rates, will begin on 1 October 2015.

This project will study the huge and far-reaching impact of the Spanish Influenza pandemic of 1918-1919 which killed some 50-100 million people worldwide, focusing particularly on its effects on Britainand her former Empire. It will look at the history of the pandemic using the IWM’s collections whichprovide a record not only of the experiences of the patients who suffered from influenza but also of the personnel, doctors, nurses and orderlies who were treating them.

The closing date is Friday 10 April 2015 

For further information follow the link:

http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections-research/research-programmes/doctoral-awards

 

 

The IWM and Public Memory of the Second World War

Applications are invited for an AHRC-funded PhD at the University of Brighton: “The IWM
and Public Memory of the Second World War”. This is offered under the AHRC
Collaborative Doctoral Partnership programme. The partner institutions are the University of
Brighton and the IWM. The studentship will be supervised by Dr Lucy Noakes and Professor
Graham Dawson, University of Brighton, and James Taylor of the IWM. This full-time
studentship, which is funded for three years at standard AHRC rates, will begin on 1 October
2015.

This project will examine the politics of Second World War display and audience
engagement and interpretation at IWM. Its overall aim is to explore the changing landscapes
of remembrance, commemoration and memory of the Second World War in Britain in both a
recent-historical and contemporary context. The project will trace the successive phases of
permanent and temporary exhibitions that have taken place at IWM since the end of the
conflict in 1945. It will deliver a critical analysis of the IWM’s programme of Second World
War exhibitions, events and related public activities. In documenting the evolving process of
Second World War display over the last 50 years, the project will uncover how memory and
commemorative practices have changed alongside myriad cumulative cultural influences.

The closing date is Friday 10 April 2015.

For further information follow the link

http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections-research/research-programmes/doctoral-awards

 

Contemporary Art and Conflict at IWM

Applications are invited for an AHRC-funded doctorate at the University of Oxford: ‘Contemporary Art and Conflict at IWM’. This is offered under the AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Partnership programme. The partner institutions are the University of Oxford and IWM.

The studentship will be supervised by Professor Anthony Gardner and Mr Paul Bonaventura of the University of Oxford and Sara Bevan of the IWM. This full-time studentship, which is funded for three years at standard AHRC rates, will begin on 1 October 2015. The student will be affiliated with The Queen’s College, Oxford.

Building on its internationally-renowned collection of 20th-century Modern British art, IWM has been commissioning, collecting and exhibiting contemporary art since the early 1970s. Contemporary art has recently become a more prominent focus within our exhibition programme and collecting ambitions, however. In 2013 IWM staged Catalyst, a significant exhibition showcasing the contemporary collection at IWM North, and launched IWM Contemporary in London, a programme of exhibitions and events by leading artists and photographers whose work responds to war and conflict. Given this reinvigorated focus, we hope that this Collaborative Doctoral Partnership will contextualise IWM’s programme within a broader field of contemporary art, with the aim of informing the Museum’s long-term thinking for the IWM Contemporary programming strand.

The closing date is Friday 10 April 2015    

For further information please follow the link:

http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections-research/research-programmes/doctoral-awards